On Your Left

When I’m riding the various trails around this area it’s always surprising to realize just how many people using them have no idea there are rules to follow. This often leads to negative interactions, and worse, accidents where people get hurt because people don’t take the time to acquaint themselves with the area they’re spending time in.

Whether on foot or on wheels when on the trails the rules are the same for everyone. If you have young children it’s important to teach them to be on the lookout for moving bicycles and staying safe.

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Rules Of The Trails

  • Stay to the right-no more than 2 across
  • Call out when passing
  • Pass on the left when it’s safe
  • Observe the right of way
  • Top Speed Limit is 15 miles an hour unless otherwise posted
  • Speed Limit is 5 miles an hour in crowded areas
  • Slow down to pass people
  • If you stop pull off the trail
  • Use hand signals-safety is our friend
  • Be polite and smile
  • Keep an eye out for dogs and children.

Bikes follow the same laws that cars do whether riding on a trail or on the street. If there’s no bike trail you use the lane just like a car does. Make sure you’re seen before advancing in traffic. I use very few bike lanes on crowded streets but living near the Bay Trail I can get away with it.

Don’t be confused with the bike in the left lane (image above.) You won’t really stay in the left lane if others are using it. This is to show how to pass someone and the correct place to be.

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“On your left,” is what you should call out when passing someone. I always say, “Thank you,” as I pass by, people resent you less for intruding with your bicycle and makes most of them smile. Being a good “Bicycle Ambassador” (a person that promotes cycling in a good way) is something to be proud of!

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Hand Signals

Hand signals are something you should learn and get in the habit of using. They are universal and easy to do. I use the easy signal on the bottom right (for my right turns) because the other way confuses me. Lol!

I don’t see these being used much on the trails but I do because it makes the path I’m taking crystal clear to others. I don’t think cyclists use them enough. You need to use them on the streets in bike lanes. Hand signals make your intentions known, show the path you’re taking and make people notice you.

There are other hand signals too, check them out at Mapmyfitness: http://blog.mapmyrun.com/10-cycling-hand-signals-need-know/

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Your Voice Is Important

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Know Your Place On The Streets

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This is what to expect from the bike lanes. I have ridden in all 3 by now. The diagram on the right can have a solid line between the car and cyclist or not.

Protect Yourself And Your Noggin

A bike helmet (or brain bucket) is your best friend for protection in case something goes wrong. Make sure you buy a good one and that it fits correctly. Most sports stores or bike shops will be glad to help you.

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Of course, you want to have your bike checked out once a year (more often if you notice problems) to make sure it’s in tip-top condition on the road. Happy cycling!

Know the rules, be polite, ride safe and stay safe.

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Writing Daily Is Hard To Do

I know I haven’t been writing daily and I plan on changing that. This is the perfect time to share what I’ve learned this last year about health and biking with you during the winter season when things slow down a bit. (Who am I kidding? Lol!) Not that I’ll quit biking here in the Bay Area, in California, I can bike all year as the weather doesn’t get close to freezing very often.

This was my first summer biking and hitting my target weight in August. Exciting times for me while I made many discoveries about myself and my health. I learned a lot and through strengthening my bad knees with my biking was able to walk for miles again. I was buying awesome new workout clothes, biking in beautiful areas and taking great photos to share. I wasn’t spending much time sitting down to write.

I promise I’ll write and share my photography more often. Now that I have so much riding time under my belt I have a lot more to share with you. I hope you will stop by and share with me too. I’d love to know where you’re at in your cycling experience. What do you want to hear?

It’s not summer anymore! My biking wardrobe now includes a knit cap under my brain bucket (helmet), long underwear under my compression jacket (with thumb holes), leather gloves, and a scarf if I need it. I wear compression capri workout pants but my legs don’t get cold enough in this weather. I keep a cheap rain suit (clear pants and coat) in my bike bag and use it. Keeps me going until springtime.

Thirty minutes into my ride when my core temperature warms up and I get into my target heart-rate zone my muscles warm up and I feel like I’m flying. I am one with the world and my rubber on the ground is the only thing holding me to the earth.

I’ll keep biking and writing about it. Lol!

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BTW, I’m putting up more photos on my sidebar. Pictures from my rides on the Bay Trail and riding mates of course! Please be patient as I add them.

Happy Biking During The Holidays!

The Nod

The serious bikers out there all wear these funny helmets. If you ever rode a motorcycle (like me) we call them “brain buckets” and for good reason. If you have a fall or god forbid, get in an accident you will be glad you are wearing one.

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They come in all styles, even aerodynamic if you’re one of those crazy fast cyclists who move at the speed of light. It’s important to be safe but without a helmet, you will be hard pressed to communicate with the other bicycle riders and that would be sad.

Being the friendly person I am when I first started riding my bike I’d see the other person coming towards me on a bike, have a big smile plastered on my face, make eye contact and before reaching them say hello. I would feel the blast of wind, see the person streak by and nothing….

Surely it wasn’t me? I pushed on….

Soon it was clear that unless it was a family biking, people walking or someone moving at a slower speed that I wasn’t doing something right. These “bikers” were just unfriendly! How could I make contact with my own kind? I kept trying, watched and waited.

Then one day I saw it…I almost missed it because it happened so fast. To be sure I watched carefully and saw it again. It was not always accompanied with eye contact but it was given freely and in solidarity. It was “the nod.” Suddenly I understood and was elated!

It’s not always easy to see and there are some cyclists who really don’t bike to be social so they will ignore you and that’s ok but if you are like me you will want to communicate with the others.

Some people smile, some don’t but you will see the nod of the helmet, a slight, quick, forward dip of the head made easier to see by the funny helmet they are wearing. Now that I’ve cracked the code you know what to do.

Next time we pass on the bike trail I’ll not be saying hello but I will give you “the nod” meaning all is well-enjoy your ride!

Safety is no joke get a helmet and wear it when you ride.