Merry Christmas Cyclists!

Tis the season to be jolly but unless you’re lucky enough to live in a state (or country) that stays warm all year you are probably wishing you could ride right about now. The holidays are good that way keeping you too busy to begrudge the cold weather and snow as you clean, trim, shop, and eat your way through the 3 months of major holidays. Hopefully, you’ll get a few presents to open unless you’ve been naughty.

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I’m lucky enough to ride all year living in the Bay Area in California although I have plenty of friends of all ages who ride in the snow and ice all over the globe. Want to meet some of them?

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I’d like to invite you to join a group I have on a social network called MeWe. When G+ (Google Plus) went away a lot of my friends joined MeWe only to find it wasn’t what we hoped for, however, I started a bike group there called “Let’s Ride” that quickly grew into over 500 members that I couldn’t give up. It’s a great group of wonderful people from all over the world that love to ride, share bike-related posts, ride stats, and more. Even if you don’t need another social network (I know the feeling) I guarantee that you’ll enjoy my group. Check us out by following either link and introduce yourself.

'Dear Santa, if you leave a new bike under the tree, I will give you the antidote to the poison I put in the milk. Timmy.'

Let’s enjoy some Christmas images I found online. Some vintage fun too.

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How are you spending your Christmas this year? I’ll be riding my bicycle and making a nice meal at home with my cat (Ninja) and roommate. Isn’t she cute in her ugly Christmas sweater? What are your fur babies wearing this Christmas?

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My Christmas sweater (sweatshirt) I got last year. I’d seen it online for many years before getting it but when I did I wasn’t disappointed. Isn’t Christmas all about ugly (or cool) sweaters?

Riding the Bay Trail this year has been beautiful and fulfilling as always. Taking a break off for surgery in August really slowed me down but I’m back at it now. I look forward to the new year with my knee replacements which have only made me better.

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I make most of these with PhotoLab by Linerook Investments LTD, an application that makes your photos into all kinds of art on Android or iPhone. You can also spiff up your selfies for social networking. Found wherever you get your phone apps. It’s free but I paid for it years ago and use it often.

It’s raining and 48 degrees outside today but the sun is supposed to show up later. I’m lucky enough to live where I can ride year-round but I do miss snow at times as I grew up in Michigan City, Indiana. I grew up ice skating, sledding, cross-country skiing and more.

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I don’t know if you heard but Grumpy Cat passed away this year. She is still the best and won’t be forgotten because as we now know, once on the internet, always on the internet.

Christmas holds so many hopes and dreams. I hope all of yours comes true and I hope you have a great Christmas! Toasting some eggnog with you, “skoal!”

* About the featured image: The Santa Rampage is coming back to Milwaukee on Saturday, Nov. 30. The Santa Rampage is an annual event in Milwaukee that features hundreds of people in Santa suits – as well as a wide swath of various holiday-themed costumes – riding their bicycles across the city. Over the last five years, it has reached such an esteemed cult-status that even the dodgy weather of the season does not detract from the merriment or the number of riders who participate in these festivities. They also have it in other states like Portland Oregon and the number of states participating grows each year.

Merry Christmas to you and your loved ones!

Back On The Road Again

I felt like it would take forever to get back on the road again after dual knee replacement on August 26th. After 2 days in the hospital and 9 days in the rehab hospital, I was glad to get home. When I came through the door my Norco was waiting patiently for me but it would take some time. It was good to be home and see my bicycle again!

I crushed my PT thanks to the experts at El Camino Acute Rehab Facility and got to ride a stationary bike several times. At the 4 week point, I was already doing what people achieved at 6 weeks and my team was pleased. I worked hard on my PT and had a group of great people at the facility that made all of the difference.

On Sept.13th I went in to have my waterproof bandages removed at my surgeon’s office. I saw my stitches for the first time and got all kinds of good news.  I had full range already and was told I could walk without my walker, drive, and even start to ride my bicycle again. Very carefully of course. This was only a month after surgery so I was thrilled!

I was having PT once a week at the clinic where I was able to ride stationary bikes, use weights and learn to walk again. Because my knees were bent replacing them meant I now had straight legs. I had been embarrassed for so long about my knees, they were ugly and made me walk with an abnormal gait. When I looked in the mirror I was in awe!

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In this photo on my bike, you can see how badly bent my legs were at the knees. In the second photo, it’s fixed. It seems like magic.

On Sept. 21st it was a warm sunny day and it seemed like a good day to try my first ride. My roommate came along to give me strength. Although I’m a seasoned cyclist I was feeling really shaky on that ride. On the other hand, what a feeling it was to be back on my bike!

The hardest part was starting out and stopping because both put the most pressure on my legs/knees. My thighs above my stitches were hurting and burning but I still made it the 8.92 miles around Coyote Point Harbor with a smile. What’s a little pain when there’s so much pleasure to be had?

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My very first bike ride after dual knee replacement was painful but oh so sweet!

Sept. 29th would be my next ride. I was going mostly on weekends with my roommate. I was feeling great but still having a lot of pain so working on recovery was paramount. Before surgery, I was riding 20-30 miles every other day and now it was 17 miles once a week but I had to start somewhere.

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That smile just keeps getting larger. At 5 weeks (above) I’m not doing too badly. My knees are still a little swelled.

Today I have 16 rides under my belt and am almost back to biking every other day. During my off time, I lost a lot of conditioning so it’s going to take months to get that back. I’ve gone out to Radio Point (26 miles) twice but am still riding 17-20 miles most days. I have my work cut out for me it just takes time.

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James (my roommate) and I taking a break on our favorite bench during a bike ride. He was great to come with me when I needed it.

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Look at those straight legs and sexy bicycle!

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The Bay Trail is on my left, San Francisco Bay on my right.

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It’s starting to get cold on my rides so it’s time to get the fur out.

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Yesterday was my last ride but I’ll be going out tomorrow! If you look into my sunglass lenses you’ll see the white pelicans I was looking at.

After all is said and done I’m back on the road again and so happy to be back! As I’ve said many times now, dual knee replacement was the hardest thing I ever did but so far it’s so worth it. The things I’ve gained outweigh the pain and hardship of recovery. It still feels new but after a year I’m told things will settle down and feel more normal.

On Feb. 20th it’ll be my 4 year anniversary for riding every other day, losing and maintaining my weight loss, and living a healthier, better life. Because of surgery, I missed more days this year than any other but I’m going to make up for it and will be celebrating heavily on that day.

Time is flying and the holidays are fast approaching with Thanksgiving coming up in a couple of weeks. I’m not ready but I never am. At this age and being solo the holidays are just more days to enjoy. I will be making a turkey and soup with the leftovers. I’m thankful I got my surgery over with after waiting for decades!

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Back in the saddle again!

Hardest Thing I Ever Did/Dual Knee Replacement

My date for surgery was August 26th. I was at my doctor’s (orthopedic) at Standford on May 10th. I was hoping for another cortisone shot to the ligaments in my legs and more physical therapy but I was sorely mistaken. I was limping yet again because my left knee had moved inside and was causing me a lot of pain when I used it.

Dr. A (everyone calls him that because no one can pronounce his name) wasn’t having it, “It’s time we replace those troublesome knees. Let’s set a date for the surgery.”

What could I say? I had one terribly bent knee that caved in because of the pressure of supporting the other damaged knee. It made me walk funny, limp, and people always noticed it when they saw me. It was very painful and had gone on for decades now causing problems with my hips and other leg structures. I sighed a big sigh.

“When I do surgery I can straighten your legs and you’ll be better than ever,” Dr. A offered with a smile.

So the day before my 65th birthday I said yes to having both knees replaced at once. Dr. A felt that I was in great shape for my age and would do well after surgery. So did I but I was hesitant.

The week before surgery I got a call from Dr. A’s assistant. He said if I came in for a special scan that they could use robotics during my surgery. I felt lucky to be picked because it would help correct my windswept knees.

The scan was nothing special they taped a bar to each leg and scanned them. The bar was part of the reference that the robot would use. It was really space-age cool stuff. Of course, I would be asleep and that was fine with me.

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Happy rides! Because of my dual knee replacement, I’ll be taking a 4-6 week break planning to be back at it real soon.

Tick tock….time flew by and one night I got the call to be at Standford Hospital for check-in at 6am with surgery at 8:15am. It was….

~Go Time~

Everything went smoothly I was in a daze and after drugs, I barely remember anything before surgery. I was under for 3 hours, (it took a little longer with the robotics) and then I woke up to a world of WTF!

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I had nerve blocks in each thigh and pressure cuffs on my lower legs for clotting. Those are pressure bandages too. I was glad for the nerve blocks when they were working.

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When they removed the pressure bandage this was what I saw. Later they got me up with a walker and make me take a few steps. I barely remember it now. Those bandages are waterproof and protect the stitches keeping them dry and together while they heal.

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With all of the drugs, I was trying to keep it together but little did I know…..

One of the nerve block boxes wouldn’t stay together (I had one in each leg) and would stop working putting me in great pain. They wouldn’t give me a new one so I had to put up with it. They even had a technician look at it. He put the battery door back on it and deemed that it would now stay put and work. It did not and when I pushed the bottom nothing happened. Each time a hapless nurse would fumble with it so I could finally get some rest.

They were very stingy with the pain meds and kept me in more pain than I should have had to put up with. When I asked for pain meds they acted controlling and secretive. I didn’t get a lot of information out of them until I pushed the subject.

I was very unhappy with the Standford Hospital and felt treated like a second-hand patient. For being a top-rated hospital they seriously treated me badly and there was a lot of broken equipment. I got no shots in the belly for clots nor did I get the plastic thing to blow in to make sure your lungs are ok after being under. Pretty shocking looking at my age and considering its standard operation after major surgery.

They left my catheter in for 2 days (until I left the hospital) and stopped giving me IV fluids for a whole day knowing I was anemic from losing so much blood during surgery. Hospitals aren’t supposed to release someone who’s been under until they are using the toilet but they pulled the catheter and sent me off in the medical transport.  This messed my kidneys up sending my potassium levels sky-high.

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Now that I’m older I’m very hard to IV as you can see. I’m glad I was out when this happened. You should see the other hand….

By the time I got to El Camino Rehab Hospital in Los Gatos, they had to IV me again and give me liquids to save my life. The high potassium levels were damaging my kidneys and they were afraid I’d have a heart attack. Luckily, they got another IV in without harming me because they got their best person from the hospital to do it. I still cried because my veins hurt badly in my arms.

The potassium levels went back to normal and I was relieved. I lost blood during surgery and the hospital should have never stopped giving me IV fluids. I was thankful but my kidneys were recovering slowly. They told me I lost a lot of blood during surgery.

Lucky I’m recovering (per the strength of my own body reserves.) My doctor is monitoring me as I speak to make sure I get back to normal body functions.

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Every dark cloud has its silver lining and this was mine. Little things keep one going when recovering from surgery or an illness.

The rehab hospital I was in was excellent! We got 2 hours of Physical Therapy and 2 hours of Occupational Therapy every day except for Sunday.  They worked us hard and helped me reach my true potential. They joked that PT really stood for Pain and Torture. I had to agree (in a good way.) The therapists and nurses really did a good job of preparing us to do our best when we get home.

Every time it was something different with a few group therapy classes thrown in. It was fun sharing exercises (and war stories) with other people who have similar goals. They let me ride the stationary bike 15 minutes at a time a few times.

I will say it now. This surgery is the hardest thing I ever did.

The support staff there were polite and helpful and the nurse’s helpers would braid my long hair. I don’t know how to do my own hair so I really appreciated little things like that. It wasn’t for fashion I needed to keep my hair out of the way in PT.

Almost everyone working at the El Camino Rehab Hospital in Los Gatos, CA were first-rate. It was the best experience I’ve ever had with a hospital. Refreshing after what I went through with Stanford after surgery. I plan to write El Camino Rehab a great review on their website after a few months of recovery.

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Soon my waterproof bandages were wrinkled and peeling off from exercising and showering. I was finally home it was a little shocking at first.

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I took to my apartment building sidewalk with my walker enjoying the flowers. My neighbors looked at me like I was crazy since they had no idea about my surgery. 

After 9 days at the rehab hospital, I was sent home with a mess of medicine, instructions, and a walker. Now I could walk around my apartment on my own. I never needed the extra equipment I got for the toilet and shower stool because our apartment is that small. I was so happy to be home with my own bed.

I can ride my bicycle again?!?!

On Sept. 13th I had an appointment with Dr. A’s assistant to have my bandages taken off. At this time I didn’t know what to expect under the bandages I was shaky about it. She was gentle with me.

She covered those stitches about with a light tape that helps the wound stay protected and heal while the stitches melt. She told me I could walk without the walker and use a cane if I wished. She also gave me the ok to ride my bicycle again and drive. She told me to be careful but if I felt strong enough I could do it.

She told me at 4 weeks I was performing at a 6 or more week level. All along, my team of health care people involved in my dual knee replacement knew the plan was to get me back on my bicycle ASAP. My job was to push myself and heal. They were very happy with my performance.

Before I left she showed me pictures of the robot working on my knees with Dr. A and the other doctors. I could see what the robot saw on the screen. I only saw 2 pictures but they were amazing.

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The scar on the right is shaped like that because I had an old surgery scar there and Dr. A used the same scar so I wouldn’t have 2 scars. They are pretty much healed.

My new knees work well, my legs are straight and I’m taller. Both legs are the same length (which doesn’t always happen) and I can bend them as much as before. I can do stairs and I’m learning to walk normally. I’m so thankful but have a lot more healing to do. Talk to me after 6 months.

I can’t believe the taller part it’s freaky and I notice it.

I’m taking PT at Standford’s Clinic once a week for a few months using their stationary bikes so I can learn to walk again, get stronger, and get back on my bike confidently. My next post will be about this so check back!

For anyone who’s going to have this surgery, I say do both knees at once. Get it done and you won’t have to do it again. It helps to be in shape. Make sure you have a doctor that you trust that talks to you. Do your homework and go to a good rehab facility. They really help and if you don’t have anyone at home because they can get you ready to go home.

Anything worth doing is worth working for.

I hope I didn’t offend with my surgery photos. Got any advice? Stories about your experience? Questions?

600,000 knee replacements are performed each year in the US.