On Your Left

When I’m riding the various trails around this area it’s always surprising to realize just how many people using them have no idea there are rules to follow. This often leads to negative interactions, and worse, accidents where people get hurt because people don’t take the time to acquaint themselves with the area they’re spending time in.

Whether on foot or on wheels when on the trails the rules are the same for everyone. If you have young children it’s important to teach them to be on the lookout for moving bicycles and staying safe.

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Rules Of The Trails

  • Stay to the right-no more than 2 across
  • Call out when passing
  • Pass on the left when it’s safe
  • Observe the right of way
  • Top Speed Limit is 15 miles an hour unless otherwise posted
  • Speed Limit is 5 miles an hour in crowded areas
  • Slow down to pass people
  • If you stop pull off the trail
  • Use hand signals-safety is our friend
  • Be polite and smile
  • Keep an eye out for dogs and children.

Bikes follow the same laws that cars do whether riding on a trail or on the street. If there’s no bike trail you use the lane just like a car does. Make sure you’re seen before advancing in traffic. I use very few bike lanes on crowded streets but living near the Bay Trail I can get away with it.

Don’t be confused with the bike in the left lane (image above.) You won’t really stay in the left lane if others are using it. This is to show how to pass someone and the correct place to be.

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“On your left,” is what you should call out when passing someone. I always say, “Thank you,” as I pass by, people resent you less for intruding with your bicycle and makes most of them smile. Being a good “Bicycle Ambassador” (a person that promotes cycling in a good way) is something to be proud of!

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Hand Signals

Hand signals are something you should learn and get in the habit of using. They are universal and easy to do. I use the easy signal on the bottom right (for my right turns) because the other way confuses me. Lol!

I don’t see these being used much on the trails but I do because it makes the path I’m taking crystal clear to others. I don’t think cyclists use them enough. You need to use them on the streets in bike lanes. Hand signals make your intentions known, show the path you’re taking and make people notice you.

There are other hand signals too, check them out at Mapmyfitness: http://blog.mapmyrun.com/10-cycling-hand-signals-need-know/

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Your Voice Is Important

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Know Your Place On The Streets

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This is what to expect from the bike lanes. I have ridden in all 3 by now. The diagram on the right can have a solid line between the car and cyclist or not.

Protect Yourself And Your Noggin

A bike helmet (or brain bucket) is your best friend for protection in case something goes wrong. Make sure you buy a good one and that it fits correctly. Most sports stores or bike shops will be glad to help you.

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Of course, you want to have your bike checked out once a year (more often if you notice problems) to make sure it’s in tip-top condition on the road. Happy cycling!

Know the rules, be polite, ride safe and stay safe.

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Fitbit Cycling Fits

I believe in health bands they do so much to help keep me on the right path helping me to balance my activities so that I can stay healthy. I couldn’t have lost weight, mastered my insomnia or kept track of my food or exercise without them. They are meant to be a tool in helping us get an idea of how we’re doing not a medical device but if used correctly they are very useful.

Recently I bought a Charge 2 Fitbit band and I love it. It gives active (during exercise) and resting heart rate, sleep stages (REM, deep sleep, etc.) it tracks diet, has a Relax (deep breathing) mode, gives you a Cardio Fitness Score and more. It’s put together well and easy to wear even while sleeping.

Fitbit has a good community of users behind their products. They have many groups one can join to exchange information and share your ups and downs with on your journey to good health. One such group I joined was Cycling and it was clear that some of these people needed my help.

The first few times I tried tracking my cycling on the Fitbit it was a trial and error period for sure. My Fitbit uses my phone’s GPS to track rides and has a feature where it will automatically track cycling after so many minutes of riding. It sounds so simple but it wasn’t.

I was already using Mapmyride and Myfitnesspal so when buying my Fitbit I made sure the app connected and shared data with Under Armor products and apps like my Jawbone UP3 had. The food data worked flawlessly but the cycling was another story.

The first time I used Mapmyride everything was good until I looked at the Fitbit app. The Fitbit mapped my ride, I couldn’t enlarge the map and the info was limited. The info from Mapmyride did not show up. The data had not exchanged and I was stuck with 2 different versions and maps of my bike ride in 2 different places. I wasn’t happy with that.

After some thought, I went into the Fitbit exercise tile and changed the settings turning auto-tracking OFF. When buying bands everything is enabled after setting up and people don’t always look at settings until something goes wrong. It’s always good to know what your band offers and set things up the way you want to.

So the next time I biked my Mapmyride data was right there under my exercise tile on the Fitbit app and I was thrilled but then I noticed something. It said that the data came from Myfitnesspal, not Mapmyride. Just to see I took Myfitnesspal out of the equation and sure enough I had problems seeing my cycling data again. So, if you don’t have Myfitnesspal connected even if you don’t use it, your data won’t show up like this.

Myfitnesspal is all about nutrition and how many calories you can eat for the day adding and subtracting calories from what you burn (or don’t) changing many times in a day.  I think because of this it’s more active in sharing data between Mapmyride and the Fitbit app so I’m thinking that’s why it works this way. It’s just a guess but if it’s not broken I’m not fixing it.

What does all this mean? If you have a Fitbit and cycle outdoors it’s very easy to get your ride turned into steps, see your normal ride stats and have it all show up under your exercise tile on the Fitbit app if you just follow these instructions. Also, many people talk about putting their Fitbit bands on their ankle, shoe or other places while biking. I don’t know what started this nonsense but you can keep your band on your wrist.

Get Your Cycling Data Here

  • download Mapmyride and Myfitnesspal
  • fill out the profiles on these apps
  • make sure all 3 apps are connected to each other
  • on the Fitbit app press the exercise tile

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  • Under the exercise tile settings tell the Fitbit to IGNORE Outdoor Bike.

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  • When IGNORED it will look like this (above)

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  • next time you bike use Mapmyride
  • when finished, sync with the Fitbit app under the exercise tile
  • your workout will be there and look like this (above)

If you want these results you must follow my instructions including using Myfitnesspal in the loop. The Fitbit can map bike rides using your phone’s GPS but I like more stats about my rides, I can go and look up my past rides, the maps can be enlarged and much more on Mapmyride.

My hope is this helps the many friends I make and have in the Cycling Group on Fitbit. I have written these instructions too many times in comments on posts asking for help so this is a selfish attempt to save time and my hand from cramping. Lol!

After riding my bike I can’t wait to pour over my statistics about my ride and find out how I did. The easier it is the better. Enjoy your rides!

For more info on what Mapmyride can do for you follow the link and read my post on it and best of all it’s free.

I don’t use Strava, or other biking apps so if you do, experiment using them instead of Mapmyride. I’d be interested in the outcome if you do.

You Got To Hit It To Get It!

Tracking Your Rides Or Map With Bekkie

Sure it’s fun riding your bike but looking back at how far you’ve come in your quest for good health by keeping track of your rides is priceless. Whether you want to remember a particular ride, see the furthest you’ve ever ridden or how you rank against other riders in your area, you’ll want to use an application to record your rides using your cell phone’s GPS.

These applications act as free bike computers giving you all kinds of information on your bike rides along with a map showing exactly where you’ve been.

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Pick your type of bicycle and start your workout.

What can they tell me that I don’t already know?

  • Average speed
  • Top speed
  • Distance rode
  • Ride duration
  • Calories burned
  • Elevation
  • Splits
  • Date
  • Time
  • Rank (comparing you to people who ride your same trails)
  • Routes

These applications keep track of every ride you do with them and you can look at your rides in detail. Open an account with them, set up your profile, pick your bike type and ride. Take some time to set up your profile because that’s how the application figures out your calories burned. They will ask you for your existing weight, sex, age, bike type, and height.

Auto-pause.

On Mapmyride there are options to auto-pause your rides meaning all you have to do is press Start and the app will stop and start when you do automatically until you’re finished without touching your phone. If you walk with your phone during your workout it might act confused but when you finish and press Stop it will have figured it all out.

Listen to your ride stats out loud.

There is a function (using your phone’s Google voice) where you can set what you want the app to tell you (out loud) while you ride. The application will tell you whether it’s paused or not and much more all without touching your phone. You don’t have to wear headphones unless you can’t hear your phone where you keep it during rides. I love that feature!

I use Mapmyfitness which is Mapmyride by Under Amor.

Confusing? Not really, Mapmyfitness is the main company that puts out the different applications for walking, running, riding, hiking and even walking your dog. To make it easy for people to find the application for their particular exercise they are color coded. No matter which one you use as soon as you sign into your account your personal info will be there.

Take a look at Mapmyride for yourself. Here are the different applications under the Mapmyfitness umbrella so you can see what I mean. You can use any of them for your bike riding they are all the same and work the same.

And there’s more…

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Connect your fitness bands, smart scales, shoes or heart rate straps.

If you have a fitness band, like a Fitbit, or a Jawbone UP3 you can connect them to Mapmyride which will share your exercise information (such as calories burned and time ridden) giving you credit on your connected band’s application. Make sure you always let your applications sync because that’s when they swap data.

For your caloric needs, Mapmyride also connects to Myfitnesspal (another Under Amor application) and will add or subtract your calories burned during biking (or exercising) to the calories you can eat for that day. Even after losing weight I still use it to log my food and maintain my weight it’s excellent.

I’ve been keeping track of my rides since my first ride on 2/20/16 when I rode 5.96 miles. It took me 1:06:06 at an average speed of 5.4 miles an hour and Mapmyride keeps track of them for me, maps and all.

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From the website, all of my personal triumphs. Clicking on any of them on the site will bring back all of my stats plus the full map.

Mapmyfitness has a website online where you can look at so many cool things about your workouts. It’s amazing how much they give you for free and although there are ads you won’t mind when you see what they offer.

What can I find on the Mapmyfitness website?

  • Workouts
  • Goals
  • Achievements
  • Calorie calculator
  • Routes (maps)
  • Challenges (get involved)
  • Blog about exercising (cycling included)
  • And more

There are other applications you can use, like Strava, that are similar but Mapmyride has been time tested by me and Under Armor is a good company. When picking out your application to use make sure you look at everything offered and read the reviews carefully. You don’t want to trust your metadata to just anyone.

You might be asking yourself why would you want to go through this hassle when you can just enjoy yourself? To become healthy it’s about more than just enjoying yourself it takes work and having the right tools for the job.

Good health is a balancing act that requires eating the right foods, getting the right amount of exercise and quality sleep each night. Once you have your health under control you’ll feel great and everything in your life will be enjoyable.

Warning! Tracking your rides and data can be addicting and have serious side effects of making you very healthy.